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The EyeTracking Blog

By EyeTracking Inc. on 5/23/2017 4:45 AM

medical training In today’s world, highly skilled jobs are becoming more demanding as personnel are expected to perform critical tasks using highly complex systems in difficult environments. Surgeons and pilots are only two examples of individuals facing such environments. Pressures on the medical and aviation industries are enormous. In the medical realm, our aging population means more medical conditions to treat and thus an ever-increasing demand for skilled medical personnel. In the aviation arena, more people are travelling to more places and thus adding further strain on the aviation industry to supply evermore pilots to meet the demands both now and into the future.

Despite these two examples being seemingly quite different, they face a common basic problem—namely time-efficient and resource-efficient training. The quality of training needs to be maintained, and ideally even improved...

By EyeTracking Inc. on 1/17/2013 2:13 PM
Eye tracking has characteristics of both quantitative and qualitative research. On one hand, you have access to a large amount of high-precision data, appropriate for detailed statistical analysis of visual behavior. On the other hand, observation of just a few eye tracking video sessions can provide valuable insight into visibility. By no means does this represent a methodological weakness, actually quite the opposite. The dovetailing of quantitative and qualitative research interests in eye tracking is a great strength. It does, however, complicate one aspect of research: SAMPLE SIZE.

Which of these researchers has a better sense of sample size in eye tracking studies - (A) a user experience analyst who plans to test 12 participants on a website or (B) a package designer who plans to test 120 participants viewing a new line of packages? The answer is both…or...
By EyeTracking Inc. on 4/3/2012 1:16 PM
In 2002, Dr. Sandra Marshall presented a landmark paper at the IEEE 7th Conference on Human Factors and Power Plants, introducing the Index of Cognitive Activity (ICA). This innovative technique "provides an objective psychophysiological measurement of cognitive workload" from pupil-based eye tracking data. In the decade since this conference, the ICA has been used by eye tracking researchers all over the world in a wide variety of contexts.

In this installment of the EyeTracking blog, we'll take a look at some of the most interesting applications of the ICA. There are many to choose from, but here are a few of the greatest hits…

The ICA in Automotive Research

Understanding the workload of drivers is central to automotive design and regulation. Schwalm et al. collected ICA data during a driving simulation including lane changes and secondary tasks. Analyses...
By EyeTracking Inc. on 8/23/2011 3:38 PM
The semiautonomous vehicle is the future of the automotive industry. Innovations such as forward collision avoidance radar and lane departure warning systems are evidence of a clear trend - little by little, demands on the driver are being shifted to the car. It's easy to see how these and other safety advances could make our roadways less dangerous. After all, the vast majority of traffic accidents are the result of human error. Any technology that can take a bit of responsibility away from the guy fiddling with the radio and playing Angry Birds while traveling 70 MPH down the freeway is welcome.

But let's not forget the 'semi' in semiautonomous. A recent feature in Wired Magazine explains the risks inherent in the automation of certain aspects of the driving experience. While computerized assistance can improve safety in dealing with stressful situations, it may actually...
By EyeTracking Inc. on 5/6/2011 2:12 PM
At midnight on Wednesday March 23rd two commercial airplanes approaching Ronald Reagan Airport in Washington D.C. requested permission to land. The tower responded with only silence. After repeated attempts at communication, both pilots were forced to navigate their descent through the darkness without the assistance of Air traffic Control.  The landings were successful and no one was injured, but when it was revealed that the controller on duty was asleep at his post, the story captured national attention.

Fatigue is unavoidable for the air traffic controller. The combination of long hours, monotonous tasks and high stress will eventually lead to physical and mental exhaustion, no matter how many cups of coffee are consumed. The event described above is just one of five cases reported in the past month. This is not a pleasant thought for the frequent flyers among us.  It means that at any given time as we hurtle through the atmosphere in a combustible tube traveling 500 miles per hour suspended 30,000...